Guest Writer's blog

The Power of the Gospel

By guest writer Rich Cundall, InFaith Board of Trustees, taken from his talk given at our 200th Anniversary Celebration on April 28, 2017 In Romans 1:16, Paul declares, “For I am not ashamed of the gospel, for it is the power of God for salvation to everyone who believes, to the Jew first and also to the Greek.” The word for “power” is the Greek word “dunamis”. It is where we get our English word “dynamite.” The gospel is the dynamite to radically change lives from the kingdom of darkness to the kingdom of light! As a mission, throughout our 200 years of ministry, we’ve embraced the truth that the power of the gospel is for everyone — for poor and rich, for males and females, for adults, teens, children and the aged. It is for Anglo-Saxons, Latinos, Chinese, Blacks and whites, for the educated and non-educated, for both the valued and the disenfranchised. We have demonstrated through our ministry that the gospel is for immigrants, Native Americans and refuges; for inmates and free; for upstanding citizens, gang members, drug addicts and the mentally ill; and for Muslims, Buddhists, and atheists. The effectiveness of InFaith has never been with the cleverness of its people, the creativeness of its programs, the courage of its leadership, or the contribution of its donors — but in the power of the gospel of Jesus Christ. The dynamite of the gospel to change lives for eternity. Our missionaries have not served seeking fame, or fortune. We’ve embraced the heart of God that no community is too small, and no people group too insignificant. Along the way, our mission family has risked everything to share the simple message of Jesus’ love, forgiveness, and salvation. I am so humbled by the faithfulness, fervor, and...

Looking at the Present in Light of Our Past

By guest writer Dixie Massey, InFaith Board of Trustees, taken from her talk given at our 200th Anniversary Celebration on April 28, 2017 We celebrate our 200th Anniversary as a mission this year. Part of the challenge of pausing in “the present moment” to celebrate is perspective. We look back with gratitude because we can more clearly see the path of what God has done. We look forward with hope and prayer over the changes that will come with new opportunities. But sometimes the present doesn’t feel like a gift. The present can be quiet. When no one answers the call for salvation. More people don’t come to ministry activities. A ministry opportunity falls through. When nothing new seems to be happening. The present can be lonely. Peers that understand are few and far between. The present can be disappointing. We’re in the middle of conflict. We’re in the middle of financial issues or health issues. And it may not feel like the present is always a time to celebrate. We’re in good company: Job cried, "If only I knew where to find him. If I go to the east, he is not there; if I go to the west, I do not find him." Losing a family and all that you own wears one down, even when we know that the name of the Lord is blessed. Elijah felt alone and isolated, saying, "I have had enough, Lord. Take my life." The disciples had to row all night before Jesus came walking on the water to them. John the Baptist asked, "Are you the one who was to come," even after he proclaimed "Look, the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world." Sitting in a prison - wrongly accused - has that...
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